The Podcast Producer: Here is Everything You Need to Know

A podcast producer editing a recorded episode
A podcast producer editing a recorded episode

By MuddHouse Media Team

A podcast producer is the creative genius behind the scenes of every podcast series. Here's what to look for when hiring a podcast producer for your branded podcast series.

What is a Podcast Producer?

Podcast producers have a lot of work to do for each podcast episode. The podcast producer manages scripts, oversees all aspects of the production, and handles all (or most) of the editing responsibilities.A podcast producer editing a new episode

But the producer's role goes well beyond the sheer technical responsibilities of podcast production. In fact, the producer's involvement begins well before an episode is even recorded. 

The Producer's Role: Pre-Production

Producers get their hands on a series at a very early stage. If you're planning to launch your branded podcast and haven't recorded yet, a producer should be involved in all your conversations to help you iron out the details of your series. They're the ones who will tell you what's realistic and what's not, and they'll make crucial creative decisions early on that can determine the success of your podcast.

In fact, you want a producer who has been involved from the beginning because it allows them to spend time researching topics and guests that will enhance the series. A good producer will become your subject matter expert, which is integral in getting your series recorded and published. Their active involvement will not only bolster your podcast, but it will also allow them to construct a better roadmap for the series.

Having all this information in place beforehand will then allow the producer to seamlessly move into the next stage of the process, recording.

The Producer's Role: Recording

Now that your series is planned and scheduled, it's time to record! This is where the producer really starts to get into the thick of it. And funny enough, the producer's role during the recording phase begins… before the recording actually starts. 

That's right — much like their role in the planning stage of a whole series, a producer needs to be in the loop for every episode before it's time to record. This can range from brainstorming (and later selecting) topics, booking guests, and finalizing the recording plan, that is, figuring out if the recording will take place in person, virtually, or a mix of both. The producer should (and must) work with the hosts to have a clear outline in place before recording. This may come in the form of a script or a rundown, but either way, the producer needs to manage that outline. 

An editing screen of a podcastWith all this in place, the recording process is then all about the technical side of things for the producer. This includes a microphone and sometimes camera setups, checking and balancing the audio, and ensuring that the recording software is working properly. It's a lot of management during this phase, meaning the producer must be able to handle a bit of pressure and manage their time wisely.

If something isn't working right, they need to be able to address the situation in a timely manner because recording schedules are oftentimes very tight with quick turnarounds. If someone's microphone sounds funky, the producer needs to step in. If the recording software is buggy, the producer needs to have a backup plan just in case. 

The Producer's Role: Post-Production

Now that the episode has been recorded, the first step is for the producer to structure the audio into a cohesive arrangement, which is a major key to cutting a podcast episode. A producer has to ensure that the entire episode, from the opening introductions to the closing remarks, resembles an organized and authentic conversation. This may mean cutting awkward silences, the "um's" and "ah's," or trimming pieces of a segment. A good producer will be comfortable reaching out to the host or a guest if there is a need to re-record a segment of the episode.

Once the raw audio is arranged accordingly, the producer can then really add their creative flair to a series. This may mean adding sound bites, music, or transitions to the episode, but it also means putting the final polish on the episode before it is ready for distribution. Again, it is their responsibility to make sure everything sounds professional.

The producer is responsible for approving the final cut of a podcast episode before it goes live, but at MuddHouse Media, we want our hosts to love the finished product. Therefore, we regularly share the final cuts of episodes with our hosts to field questions, feedback, and suggestions. We recommend having a producer who is adaptable and prepared to make adjustments before publishing.

The Producer's Role: Overall Outlook

A podcast producer has a lot on their plate. They are just as involved as the host and guests are. In fact, one could even argue that a producer is more involved in a series than anyone else. 

Not sure where to start? That’s why we’re here. 

At MuddHouse Media, we are a team of experienced media professionals who specialize in expert storytelling. We’ll help you find the right story (or stories) to tell through a podcast, and we’ll be with you every step of the way. 

Want to learn more? Head on over to our Corporate Podcasting page for all the information!

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Michele Tafoya Joins Beat the Press

Beat the Press

On Beat the Press, host Emily Rooney is joined by a panel of media critics to take you behind the scenes of the world's biggest and most influential media outlets featuring unusual moments that capture the public's opinion.

By Matthew McGuirk

Episode 13 of Beat the Press

On this special episode of Beat the Press, host Emily Rooney is joined by longtime Sunday Night Football sideline reporter Michele Tafoya, who departed the sports world to launch a career in politics and commentary. 

Michele Tafoya Reflects on Leaving Sunday Night Football Role 

Michele Tafoya left her position as the sideline reporter for NBC’s Sunday Night Football broadcasts earlier this year to launch a career in the political world, and she discussed what went into the decision and why it was the right move on Beat the Press. A football in black and white

“People have said, ‘You're crazy, Michele,’” Tafoya said. “But you know what, I had done it for so long, the better part of thirty years spent in sports broadcasting, and I knew I wasn't going to have forever to, as you put it, reimagine myself. So I had to do it sooner than later.”

 

America in a ‘Terrifying Spot’ as People Fear Expressing Beliefs, Says Michele Tafoya 

Following what Michele Tafoya described as an “ambush” on the Dan Le Batard Show, she addressed how certain members of society shy away from sharing things that resemble their beliefs for fear of being rejected. 

“I see my friends on Facebook,” Tafoya said. “I talk to people all over the place who, no matter which direction they lean, are sometimes really afraid to repost an article or to repost any kind of stance that reflects their values. And they're afraid because they don't want to lose friends, they don't want to lose family members, they don't want to lose their jobs. We are in a terrifying spot in America if that is a fear felt by so many, and I believe it is. I just want to sort of be out there for those people and speaking on their behalf or, better yet, encouraging them to speak with me.”

 

Michele Tafoya Points Out ‘Huge Gap’ in Thinking Regarding Abortion in America

Michele Tafoya recently spent time working on the campaign for Kendall Qualls, a Republican gubernatorial candidate who was running in Minnesota, and her position as a self-described “pro-choice libertarian” conflicted with the views of Qualls, who supports restricting access to abortion. Tafoya explained her stance on the matter, saying she is “pro-choice, with exceptions,” then addressed how polarized our country is on this topic. 

Protesters holding signs at a Pro Choice rally“I've really listened on this one because it is such a hot-button topic,” Tafoya said. “I wonder how we are so divided and it's caused so much heat in this country, this topic. But I think that a lot of it is because, again, we've only done the first stage thinking, and that is, you know, ‘no, abortion should never be allowed,’ or on the other side, ‘it's my right, don't you even come touch my reproductive rights.’ There's a huge gap there in thinking. So when is abortion okay? When should it not be okay? Are there exceptions? What are the exceptions? When are the exceptions? When do we start to recognize that that little human in your belly, yes, actually is a human, that is a viable life?”

 

Listen to Michele Tafoya on Beat the Press now!

 

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From Wimbledon to Nashville, catch up with MuddHouse Media in June 2022!

The MuddHouse Media Logo on the Glen Campbell Museum in Nashville, TN during CMA Fest 2022

From banning Russian athletes at Wimbledon to CMA Fest in Nashville, find out what the hosts and partners of MuddHouse Media have been up to this June!

By Matthew McGuirk

The MuddHouse Media Logo on the Glen Campbell Museum in Nashville, TN during CMA Fest 2022

MuddHouse Media on Broadway in Nashville

MuddHouse was featured at the CMA Fest in Nashville earlier this month when Country Music Success Stories hosts Candy O’Terry, and Jacy Dawn Valeras hosted live interviews with top country talent. 

 

 

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A post shared by MuddHouse Media (@muddhousemedia)

“It is an honor to see MuddHouse Media’s visibility on the iconic street of Broadway in Nashville for CMA Fest this year,” said MuddHouse Media CEO Kris Meyer. “Candy and Jacy are two best in class podcast hosts and partners to MuddHouse.”

Patrick McEnroe Headed to Wimbledon

Holding Court host Patrick McEnroe headed to the Wimbledon tennis tournament in London, where he’s covering the event for ESPN from June 27 to July 10. 

 

McEnroe penned an opinion piece for CNN, where he argued against Wimbledon's decision to ban Russian and Belarusian athletes from the event.

Beat the Press Addresses Important Questions about Mass Shooting Coverage

Following the tragic shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, Beat the Press dedicated an entire episode to discussing the role of the media in covering these mass shootings. Host Emily Rooney was joined by Lylah Alphonse of The Boston GlobeDan Kennedy of Northeastern University, and Joanna Weiss of Experience Magazine as they addressed the media contagion effect, covering the shooter, releasing photographs of the deceased, and the politics of guns. 

 

 

Rooney and her panel made the decision to record this single-themed episode to foster an important conversation about covering this recurring problem in the U.S.

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Top of the World Podcast: WTC developer Larry Silverstein reflects on the future of office space in a post-pandemic world

The 11-part series airs Tuesdays at 7pm EST through Sept. 11th

By Connell Oberman

Design and architecture team review the World Trade Center masterplan with Daniel Liebsekind.

In July 2001, Larry Silverstein, chairman of Silverstein Properties, purchased a 99-year lease on the World Trade Center towers worth $3.2 billion in what was the most expensive real estate transaction in the history of New York at the time. Little did he know, the newly acquired buildings would be decimated in the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil only 6 weeks later on September 11th. In the wake of the disaster, Silverstein was faced with the near-impossible task of rebuilding. Despite insurance companies’ attempts to buy him out, Silverstein remained steadfast in his commitment to restoring the heart of lower Manhattan. “I’m a New Yorker. I have an obligation to rebuild,” Silverstein recalls in the first episode of the 11-part series Top of the World: Lessons from Rebuilding the World Trade Center. “That’s my job. I’ll rebuild it.”

Larry Silverstein looking out the window of the new 7 WTC building.

20 years and 4 and half towers later, Silverstein and New York City face a new challenge: the COVID-19 pandemic. Leading up to the initial outbreak, the towers’ office spaces were fully leased to high-profile tenants such as Uber and Spotify. However, as the deadly virus swept through the country, workers swiftly transitioned to a work-from-home model in accordance with quarantine protocols, leaving the newly erected towers empty. 

Nevertheless, Mr. Silverstein is confident that the importance of in-person office spaces, especially those in the new World Trade Center, will endure. “There’s nothing like getting together with your colleagues,” Silverstein tells Top of the World host and Silverstein Properties Chief Marketing Officer Dara McQuillan. “That’s irreplaceable.” Having lived through national crises such as 9/11 and the COVID-19 pandemic, 90-year-old Mr. Silverstein believes firmly in New York’s resiliency. “The one thing I’ve learned is that you never bet against New York,” he says. Check out the entire conversation on “The Developer: Never Bet Against New York,” the first episode of Muddhouse Media’s new series Top of the World: Lessons from Rebuilding the World Trade Center, available on SiriusXM Business Radio. 

The conversation about the future of in-person work continues on the next episode, “The Master Plan”, with World Trade Center master architect Daniel Libeskind. Mr. Libeskind discusses his revolutionary vision for the new World Trade Center and how it  will shape New York’s future in a post-pandemic world. Stay tuned each week for new episodes focusing on different facets of the rebuilding process featuring exciting guests such as New York Mayor

Michael Bloomberg, CBRE CEO Mary Ann Tighe, WTC designers Sean Johnson, Carlos Valverde, Duan He, Scott Thompson and Michiko Ashida, New York residents Jessica Lappin and Catherine McVay Hughes, author Judith Dupré, photographer Joe Woolhead, producer Mike Marcucci, President of the Perelman Center for Performing Arts Leslie Koch, artists Kerry Irvine, Joohee Park, Lady Aiko, Risa Boogie and Cristina Martinez, Silverstein Properties CEO Marty Burger, Managing Partner for Brookfield Maria Masi, Founder of Dabar Development Partners Dawanna Williams, and WTC 5 architect Rob Whitlock. 

A new episode airs every Tuesday until September 11th on Sirius XM channel 132. All episodes will be available to stream on Pandora and Stitcher Premium on September 6th. Click the link here for exclusive behind-the-scenes photos and check out the teaser below!

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Holding Court Podcast on the U.S. Open: Sports in the Bubble

By Grant Vanzura

Across the sports world, drastic changes have been implemented to ensure the safety of the players, coaches, and commentators. The NBA popularized the use of a bubble to restrict athletes from coming into contact with anyone who may have contracted COVID-19. So far, the NBA’s bubble experience has been successful which led to the 2020 U.S. Open implementing similar protocols for their players. In MuddHouse Media’s host Patrick McEnroe’s Podcast: Holding Court, he speaks about some of the differences that players and others involved faced this year versus past tournaments. So what exactly were these differences?

In previous years, U.S. Open participants spent much of their time in Manhattan where there are countless activities to do in the big city. Now that players needed to stay in the bubble, they needed to find other sources of entertainment. Recognizing this, the organizers of the tournament set up a big screen in the courtyard where players could compete in a trivia night or watch other sports such as the NBA and NHL playoffs. They also provided a game room in the bubble where foosball was a main source of entertainment for the players. 

The new bubble environment also caused some other changes in the matchplay during the tournament. The two biggest stories involved Novak Djokovic and Naomi Osaka. Osaka made headlines early on for her willingness to withdraw from the tournament due to social justice reasons. The organizers delayed the matches to allow Osaka to continue to compete. She ultimately would end up winning the Women’s Singles Tournament. Djokovic who is the World’s overall men’s number one player was disqualified from the tournament due to hitting a linesperson accidentally out of frustration. He has apologized and the situation resulted in an open field for the men’s championship.  

Another major change for this year’s U.S. Open tournament was the limiting of fans due to Covid-19 restrictions. McEnroe speaks about how this can negatively affect players during their matches. Some players specifically feed off the energy that the crowd gives them to gain momentum in their matches. Without the fans, preparation and experience could provide players with the edge required to win the match. McEnroe talks about the Andrey Rublev vs Daniil Medvedev match which resulted in Medvedev winning the match in a 7-5 tie-breaker. The two Russian competitors had previous experience playing each other in which Medvedev got the edge which McEnroe attributes to his win in this U.S. Open. Medvedev seemed to have the confidence at the end of the match to overcome the upset bid by Rublev. U.S. Women’s Tennis star Serena Williams may also have been affected by the changes to the format of the tournament. Fueled by her large fanbase, Williams usually has crowd support to give her the confidence and energy to dispel her opponents. However, in this year’s tournament, the lack of fans may have made her opponent Victoria Azarenka more comfortable and ultimately defeat Serena in the semi-final.   

Overall, despite the fact the fans and participants had to perform and be contained in the Bubble, the overwhelming opinion was that the tournament still brought fans the usual excitement and that the USTA did a wonderful job not only ensuring the safety of the participants but facilitating excellent matchplay. And Muddhouse Media’s host of the Holding Court Podcast series Patrick McEnroe was right there in the Bubble providing expert commentary for ESPN throughout.  Check out his podcasts on the U.S. Open to hear more!

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Top Ten Reasons to Listen to the new Saints, Sinners and Serial Killers Podcast on Muddhouse Media

By Grant Vanzura

Saints, Sinners and Serial Killers, a new crime podcast hosted by authors Dave Wedge and Casey Sherman, focuses on exclusive information about numerous notorious criminals. The podcast kicks off with a two-part episode featuring Whitey Bulger’s story and the FBI’s quest to bring him to justice. Wedge and Sherman disclose Bulger’s story, drawing details from their new novel: Hunting Whitey. The Boston reporters focus on exclusive stories and interviews that unmask many details of the chase and the killing of Bulger. The acclaimed authors paint a more complete picture of the criminal’s mind as well as that of law enforcement tirelessly working on the arrest. Saints, Sinners, and Serial Killers invites listeners to join Wedge and Sherman on their riveting journey to discover the real truth about one of America’s most dangerous and most fascinating former mobsters.

1

The hosts, Dave Wedge and Casey Sherman are both New York Times bestselling authors based in Boston, the site where much of the Whitey Bulger saga takes place. 

2

The show features a variety of unreleased, exclusive interviews and investigative reportage on the complete story and inside scoops about Whitey Bulger.

3

While the majority of media coverage on Bulger focuses on his crimes, Sherman and Wedge capture the riveting details of his life on the run and experiences in prison.

4

Hear chilling audio of Whitey Bulger himself sharing his thoughts on being captured.

5

Discover the critical details that allowed for the police to trail the breadcrumbs of evidence left by Bulger.

6

Listen to an exclusive interview of Bulger’s cellmate and friend describing an assassination attempt on Bulger’s life.

7

The hosts interview FBI special agent Scott Garriola; the man who made the arrest of Bulger and his confidant.

8

The hosts lived in the Boston area during Bulger’s criminal peak and can speak of their own memories and discoveries while investigating the case as it happened.

Dave Wedge and Casey Sherman

9

Find out insider information from the daughter of the man accused of killing Whitey Bulger.

10

Discover chilling details about the corruption of the FBI during the chase for Whitey Bulger.

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